TamilWeek Feb 5, 2005
Jayantha Dhanapala:
"Apey Kolla"

by Prof. C. Sooriyakumaran

Quite rightly our candidate for Secretary
General has been publicized in our
columns and Sri Lankans would naturally
want to wish him assured success.
This brief note is however also to assert that once he becomes
Secretary General, as we hope, he would also reflect in true reality
the priorities and needs of the Third World, including in our own
little country- our political cauldron in which we have been for such
long years now.

Very briefly, some illustration of these show what we mean and what
he needs to do about them. On our own political scene, he has
been quoted as making statements such as that the LTTE has to
learn democracy, or that it cannot be trusted - so called conclusions
that can only come out of a grossly inadequately briefed mind on
these past decades.

As I wrote more than once - with wide approbation - it was not the
Tamils that created the LTTE but the Sinhalese, meaning of course
elements amongst the Sinhalese. He would know this history - the
'58 slaughter, the B-C Pact scuttling and the jettisoning by the
Youth of the Tamil civic leadership, the Army cruelties of the '70's in
the North, the Inferno '83 and all as history.

Secondly, given a history of totally obtuse uni-ethnic majority
government at the Centre it was only natural that the opposing
rebels sought rebellious modes of conduct in their dealing with their
opponents. This latter is history not singular, but in all revolutionary
histories in the past. A Secretary General who carries this into his
office would be least comfortable to countries in situations such as
ours.

Thirdly, and to be brief, as mentioned in my earlier writings
repeatedly, the international reality of the future - not too distant at
that, is of a new re-emergence from the present unipolar world, to
very likely, a tri-polar world. This has no where appeared in
Dhanapala's thinking or intention or agenda, for his intended high
international future!

Fourthly, despite the pronouncements on the complexity of the UN
as an organisation one looks to find specific hard core
conceptualizations on a real potential future structure at the UN
reflected anywhere in his statements (
c.f. my article Daily News 31st
March 2003).

For his sake and for our sake as Third World, let us hope for this
new dimension from him. As the phrase goes, he is "Apey Kolla"
and at the end of it all, in tribal fashion, we would want to see him
there.